Page 25 - WestlawnMasthead19_Sept11.pub

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Shoal draft, low building cost, and
substantial cargo capacity for
their size were the driving forces
behind the scow schooner. Usu-
ally flat bottom and of heavy
cross-plank construction, they
were popular on the U.S. West
Coast, Gulf Coast and in places
on the Northeast, where
Lily
was
built in Martha’s Vineyard. In the
Massachusetts Bay, these schoo-
ners were often used to haul
stone. Framing was massive, with
enormous timbers held together
with numerous large drift bolts
and spikes.
Different regions had different
nicknames for these vessels:
“square-toe frigates,” in the
Northeast, but “but-heads,” in the
Gulf.
There were also Great Lake’s
scow schooners, and scow schoo-
ners out of New Zealand. A few
scow schooners have been de-
signed as yachts, by designers Bill
Garden and Billy Atkin, among
others.
Originally
Lily of Tisbury
, at this
writing
Lily,
is based in Stuart,
Florida. She’s available for char-
ter, so you can actually go for a
sail on one of these boat. In fact,
Lily
is the last boat (or one of the
last) purpose-built for hauling
cargo under sail alone in the U.S.
To learn more about
Lily
and to
arrange a charter, go to:
Treasure Coast Sailing Adven-
tures:
www.treasurecoastsailingadventu
res.com
Photos by Nick Di Matteo, Westlawn Instructor