Page 5 - WestlawnMasthead23_Sept12.pub

The Masthead
March 2012 Page 5
Sept. 2012 Page 5
Westlawn’s Maryland Meet
-
Continued from previous page
naval architect, Chuck Neville. Chuck provided an overview
of his entire career in naval architecture, starting with his
first design job working for Charlie Morgan. There were nu-
merous examples and slides of Chuck’s beautiful designs. A
free-flowing question and answer session covered a wide
range of technical topics. The attendees were left with much
food for thought. Students agreed it had been an entertain-
ing, valuable, and instructive get-together, with a typical
comment:
A very sincere thank you to Norm, Dave, Patti, Nick
and Eric for having us all and putting the entire event
together and a special thanks to Charles Neville for
his time on Sunday.
As an early YD 01 student, I can say this was an
enlightening event. Meeting fellow students, gradu-
ates and the faculty and finding everyone so enthusi-
astic about the program was just what I needed. I
have arrived back home with a renewed eagerness
myself and look forward to continuing my lessons.”
The Enigma Ma-
chine: This was the
German code ma-
chine used for war-
time radio commu-
nications. The Ger-
mans considered
the code unbreak-
able even if an
Enigma Machine
was captured. The
U.S. Navy captured
a German U-boat
with this Enigma
Machine aboard. A
team of British
mathematicians,
lead by Alan Tur-
ing, then used it to
do what the Ger-
mans considered
impossible. They
broke the code,
and the Allies were
able to read most German communications for the rest of
the war. It was one of the pivotal moments of World War II.
Model in the Rogers Ship Model Collection
Instructor Nick Di Matteo (left) reviewing design concepts
with Philippe Torres
Chris Cochran with the models at the Farr design office
U.S. Naval Acad-
emy’s large tow-
ing tank. It is
380
ft. long by
26
ft. wide and
16
ft. deep and
is fitted with
wave-making
devices to en-
able the study of
vessels in waves
as well as still-
water resis-
tance.